BUILD INSTRUCTIONSbuild-index.htmlfile://localhost/build-index-1194.htmlshapeimage_1_link_0
PROJECT’S SOURCE CODEcode-index.htmlfile://localhost/code-index-518.htmlshapeimage_2_link_0
 

TECHNIQUE:  BRON (BLUETOOTH ROBOT-ORIENTED NETWORK)

PUBLICATION DATE:  February 22, 2013

PUBLISHER:  McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics

SUMMARY:

Using Bluetooth, coordination, and agent-based techniques to create a team of robots; sending and receiving Bluetooth messages, data, and commands among robots, between a robot and a computer, and between an Android smart phone and a robot.


  Teamwork Means Coordination with a Goal



There are 3 basic ways to coordinate 2 or more robots or team members:


    Time-Based or Chronology-Based  Coordination


In chronology-based coordination the order that the robots start and finish is critical.  There are nine  possible order configurations between any two robots or team members. For example:


Robot  A       Robot B

Start  
    Start
Start  
    Finish
Finish 
    Start
Finish 
    Finish
Start  
    Wait
Wait   
    Start
Finish 
    Wait
Wait   
    Finish
Wait   
    Wait


These coordination relationships are important  for a number of reasons.  But its usually easy to see if you ask yourself  when  this robot is performing this task  what are the other robots doing?  Should they be doing anything?   Does Robot A depend on Robot B for some reason.  While time or chronology coordination may on the surface appear straight forward, there are many pitfalls.  The robots to be coordinated are operating with different motor speeds and  different acceleration settings.  Power source can become a factor.   Things such as wheel size  can impact  distance vs. time calculations.   Even size and weight can become a factor when attempting to  coordinate  two or more robots based on time.


    Event-Based Coordination


Robots can also be coordinated based on events. The relationships shown earlier for two or more robots also hold for event-based coordination. Robot  A may be a search  robot  that  is programmed to find an object and report the location of that object.  Robot B might be a retrieval robot.  Robot B is given the location of the object and then retrieves it.  Robot B cannot do its job until Robot A does its job.  The event that causes  Robot A to  stop processing is the location of the object and the event that causes Robot B to start its processing is the location of the object.



    Message-Based Coordination


A message can be anything from a single character or number to a string containing any  kind of information.  In fact, any piece of data or information exchanged between two or more robots can be considered a message. We use several important message-passing schemes or paradigms to accomplish our robotic teamwork. For example:


Initiator
    Receiver (Sender-Receiver)
Producer
    Consumer

            ...

Client
   Server


 
TEAM LEADER APPROACHbron-index_leader.htmlshapeimage_17_link_0
TEAM CAPABILITY MATRIX (TCM)bron-index_tcm.htmlshapeimage_18_link_0
DOES NETWORKED ROBOTS EQUAL ROBOT TEAMWORK?bron-index.htmlbron-index.htmlshapeimage_19_link_0shapeimage_19_link_1
BASIC BRON APPROACHbron-index_basic.htmlshapeimage_20_link_0